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Lynx Point Siamese: Facts, Origin & History (with Pictures)

siamese lynx point

The Lynx Point Siamese cat is a mixed breed created by combining the Seal Point Siamese with a tabby cat. This cat is a little larger than the traditional Siamese and more sociable while keeping the general appearance of the Siamese. You can find it in a wide range of colors and patterns and it is extremely healthy, usually living more than 15 years.

hepper cat paw dividerThe Earliest Records of a Lynx Point Siamese in History

The Lynx Point Siamese got its start in the 1940s when a Seal Point Siamese cat accidentally mated with a tabby. It didn’t get much attention at first, but breeders quickly noticed the softer temperament of this mix, and many prefer it over the less social nature of the Siamese. By the 1960s, it had begun increasing in popularity, and it continues to do so today. The Lynx in its name is because the color patterns of its coat resemble those of a wild lynx.

lynx point siamese_Kolander Art_Shutterstock
Image Credit: Kolander Art, Shutterstock

How the Lynx Point Siamese Gained Popularity

As we mentioned earlier, one of the main reasons that the Lynx Point Siamese became so popular is because it’s much friendlier and sociable than its Siamese parent, but retains the highly sought-after Siamese color point pattern. This pattern is a form of Albinism that causes the cat to have more color on the cooler parts of the body, like the face, tail, and paws, while the warmer parts like the main body remain mostly white. It’s quite rare, and only a few breeds possess the gene necessary for it to occur. The tabby cat also allows for a calico tortoiseshell color point pattern, which is extremely rare and highly sought after.

Formal Recognition of Lynx Point Siamese

There are currently two organizations that recognize the Lynx Point Siamese, though they use different names for it. The Cat Fanciers’ Association in America calls it a Lynx Color Point Shorthair, while the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy in the United Kingdom calls it a Tabby Point Siamese.

Lynx point siamese cat
Image Credit: Seattle Cat Photo, Shutterstock

Top 8 Unique Facts About Lynx Point Siamese

  • The Lynx Point Siamese cat was an accidental mix of a Siamese Cat and a tabby cat.
  • The Lynx Point Siamese cat gets along with children and other pets.
  • Lynx PointSiamese cats are usually on the smaller side and rarely weigh more than 12 pounds fully grown.
  • The Lynx Point Siamese is a good choice if you live in a small apartment.
  • Lynx Point Siamese cats usually have stripes, while the Siamese parent will usually have a solid color.
  • Mixed breeds like the Lynx Point Siamese tend to have fewer health problems.
  • The Siamese characteristics in these cats make them a good choice if you spend a lot of time at work, as they are more independent in nature.
  • While the Lynx Point Siamese is rare, it shouldn’t be too difficult to find a breeder that can create one for you.

Does Lynx Point Siamese Make a Good Pet?

The Lynx Point Siamese makes a fantastic pet, and many people prefer it over the Siamese parent. It’s friendly and sociable like most tabby cats and will often sit on your lap, greet you at the door when you return home, and sniff around strangers when they come to your house. However, it retains the attractive color point pattern and ability to adapt to almost any living arrangement and is just as comfortable in a small apartment as a large home. It gets along with children and other pets but is just as happy to sit by itself in a sunny window while you are off at work.

hepper cat paw dividerConclusion

The Lynx Point Siamese is a great choice for anyone looking to add another cat to the family. Its unique color point patterns are available in several colors, and you can even find it in the ultra-rare tri-colored calico pattern. We hope you have enjoyed our look into this mixed breed and learned something new. If we have convinced you to seek out a breeder, please share this guide to the Lynx Point Siamese on Facebook and Twitter.


Featured Image Credit: Seattle Cat Photo, Shutterstock

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