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10 Best Cat Foods for Hairballs in Canada – 2024 Reviews & Top Picks

Kathryn Copeland

By Kathryn Copeland

cat lying near pet brush and hairball

Cats make wonderful companions and can provide their owners with plenty of entertainment. One of the unfortunate aspects of cat ownership, however, is the occasional hairball incident. But sometimes a change in diet can help.

We did the research and developed reviews of 10 of the best cat foods that can help with hairballs and that are available to Canadians. We hope that you’ll find the right balance with a new food that your cat enjoys and that will also reduce those dreaded hairballs!

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A Quick Comparison of Our Favorites in 2024

Rating Image Product Details
Best Overall
Winner
IAMS Proactive Health Adult Hairball Care Dry Cat Food IAMS Proactive Health Adult Hairball Care Dry Cat Food
  • Main ingredient is whole chicken, for stronger muscles
  • 5% fibre with prebiotic and beet pulp
  • Vitamin E for immune system support
  • Best Value
    Second place
    Purina ONE Hairball Formula Dry Cat Food Purina ONE Hairball Formula Dry Cat Food
  • Well-priced
  • Uses natural fibre to reduce hairballs
  • Contains calcium and phosphorus
  • Premium Choice
    Third place
    Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Dry Cat Food Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Dry Cat Food
  • High in fibre at 9.3%
  • Assists in urinary and hairball issues
  • Controlled urinary pH and low magnesium for urinary tract
  • Royal Canin Feline Care Nutrition Hairball Care Royal Canin Feline Care Nutrition Hairball Care
  • Food to help cats with hairballs
  • Blend of fibres aids digestion
  • Assists in moving hairballs through the GI tract
  • Blue Buffalo Wilderness Hairball Control Dry Cat Food Blue Buffalo Wilderness Hairball Control Dry Cat Food
  • Whole chicken for lean muscles
  • Grain free for cats sensitive to grains
  • Blend of natural fibres to reduce hairballs
  • The 10 Best Cat Foods for Hairballs in Canada

    1. IAMS Proactive Health Adult Hairball Care Dry Cat Food — Best Overall

    IAMS Proactive Health Adult Hairball Care Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Chicken, chicken by-product meal, ground whole-grain corn
    Protein Content: 32%
    Fat Content: 14%
    Calories: 399 kcal/cup

    IAMS Proactive Health Adult Hairball Care Dry Cat Food is our pick for the best overall cat food for hairballs in Canada. It has 8.5% of fibre that comes in the form of beet pulp and prebiotics, which can help reduce hairballs. It also features real chicken as the main ingredient. It has vitamin E to support the immune system and omega-3 and -6 fatty acids that will contribute to a healthy coat and skin. There are no artificial preservatives or colours.

    The cons with this food include that it might not help all cats with hairballs, and some picky cats might not like it.

    Pros
    • Main ingredient is whole chicken, for stronger muscles
    • 5% fibre with prebiotic and beet pulp
    • Vitamin E for immune system support
    • Omega-3 and -6 for healthy skin and coat
    • No artificial colours or preservatives

    Cons
    • Doesn’t help every cat with hairballs
    • Not all cats will like it


    2. Purina ONE Hairball Formula Dry Cat Food — Best Value

    Purina ONE Hairball Formula Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Chicken, corn gluten meal, chicken by-product meal
    Protein Content: 34%
    Fat Content: 14%
    Calories: 445 kcal/cup

    Purina’s ONE Hairball Formula Dry Cat Food is the best cat food for hairballs in Canada for the money. It’s affordable and uses natural fibre to help reduce hairballs. Also, whole chicken is the main ingredient. It contains the right balance of minerals and vitamins, including phosphorus and calcium, as well as omega-6 for a healthy coat and skin. There are no added artificial flavours or preservatives.

    However, while most cats will be fine with this food, some cats might end up with an upset stomach after eating it.

    Pros
    • Well-priced
    • Uses natural fibre to reduce hairballs
    • Contains calcium and phosphorus
    • Omega-6 for healthy skin and coat
    • No added artificial preservatives or flavours

    Cons
    • Might give some cats an upset stomach


    3. Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Dry Cat Food — Premium Choice

    Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Chicken, whole-grain wheat, corn gluten meal
    Protein Content: 5%
    Fat Content: 16%
    Calories: 324 kcal/cup

    Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Dry Cat Food is our pick for premium choice. It helps not only with hairball control but also with your cat’s urinary tract. It’s high in natural fibre at 9.3% and contains controlled urinary pH. It’s low in magnesium for the urinary tract. It also includes high-quality fibre, antioxidants, and fatty acids that support the digestive and immune systems and a healthy coat and skin.

    That said, it’s our premium choice for a reason: It’s high-quality for a high price. Also, the size of the kibble is large, so some cats might find it challenging to eat.

    Pros
    • High in fibre at 9.3%
    • Assists in urinary and hairball issues
    • Controlled urinary pH and low magnesium for urinary tract
    • Fatty acids for skin, antioxidants for the immune system, and fibre for digestion

    Cons
    • Expensive
    • Large kibble


    4. Royal Canin Feline Care Nutrition Hairball Care

    Royal Canin Feline Care Nutrition Hairball Dry Food

    Main Ingredients: Chicken meal, corn, brewers rice
    Protein Content: 32%
    Fat Content: 13%
    Calories: 338 kcal/cup

    Royal Canin’s Feline Care Nutrition Hairball Care is what our chose as a food to help cats with hairballs. It uses a blend of fibres that can help with digestion, and it works to move the ingested hair through the gastrointestinal tract. So, when your cat swallows a large amount of fur while grooming, this food ensures that there will be less chance of hairballs being thrown up. Most cats also seem to love eating it. However, this food is expensive.

    Pros
    • Food to help cats with hairballs
    • Blend of fibres aids digestion
    • Assists in moving hairballs through the GI tract
    • Most cats love eating it

    Cons
    • Expensive


    5. Blue Buffalo Wilderness Hairball Control Dry Cat Food

    Blue Buffalo Wilderness Hairball Control Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Deboned chicken, chicken meal, pea protein
    Protein Content: 38%
    Fat Content: 16%
    Calories: 410 kcal/cup

    Blue Buffalo Wilderness Hairball Control Dry Cat Food is full of whole ingredients like chicken that help keep your cat’s muscles lean. If your cat has sensitivities to grain, this diet is grain free, and it has natural fibres to minimize hairballs. Blue Buffalo also includes its LifeSource Bits (small, dark bits mixed in with the kibble), which feature a blend of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants designed for overall health. Blue Buffalo is also known for not including any fillers or artificial ingredients in its recipes.

    But it is expensive, though not as pricey as some other foods, and some cats might experience stomach upset.

    Pros
    • Whole chicken for lean muscles
    • Grain free for cats sensitive to grains
    • Blend of natural fibres to reduce hairballs
    • Includes LifeSource Bits for overall health
    • Doesn’t contain fillers or artificial ingredients

    Cons
    • Expensive
    • Some cats might have stomach upset


    6. Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Canned Cat Food

    Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Canned Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Water, chicken, turkey giblets
    Protein Content: 3%
    Fat Content: 1%
    Calories: 84 kcal/can

    Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Canned Cat Food contains natural fibre that reduces hairballs, along with a balance of minerals, including magnesium, for a healthy urinary system. There are omega-3 and -6 fatty acids and vitamin E for healthy skin and coat, and it’s in a pâté form, which most cats love.

    Unfortunately, it is expensive, and the consistency can be mushy. However, if your cat likes it, extra liquid in your cat’s food is a good thing.

    Pros
    • Contains natural fibre to reduce hairballs
    • Includes essential minerals, including magnesium, for urinary system health
    • Vitamin E and omega-3 and -6 for healthy skin and coat
    • Pâté texture that most cats love

    Cons
    • Pricey
    • Mushy consistency


    7. Nulo Freestyle Hairball Management Dry Cat Food

    Nulo Freestyle Hairball Management Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Deboned turkey, chicken meal, deboned cod
    Protein Content: 40%
    Fat Content: 16%
    Calories: 444 kcal/cup

    Nulo Freestyle Hairball Management Dry Cat Food contains natural insoluble fibres, including Miscanthus grass, which helps move swallowed hair through the digestive tract. The first four ingredients come from animal sources, and there are antioxidants, including vitamins C and E, for immune system support. Nulo adds a probiotic strain that will support the immune system and gastrointestinal health.

    This is an expensive food, though, and some cats don’t like it.

    Pros
    • Includes Miscanthus grass to move hair through the digestive system
    • First four ingredients are animal proteins
    • Antioxidants and vitamins C and E for immune system support
    • Probiotic for GI and immune system health

    Cons
    • Expensive
    • Some cats don’t like it


    8. IAMS Proactive Health Indoor Weight & Hairball Care Dry Cat Food

    IAMS Proactive Health Indoor Weight & Hairball Care Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Salmon, chicken by-product meal, corn grits
    Protein Content: 30%
    Fat Content: 11%
    Calories: 348 kcal/cup

    IAMS Proactive Health Indoor Weight & Hairball Care Dry Cat Food features salmon as the first ingredient for strong muscles. The issue with hairballs is helped with a fibre blend that includes beet pulp to reduce them. Also, the use of L-carnitine can help cats either lose excess weight or maintain a healthy weight. The only issue is that not every cat like this food.

    Pros
    • Salmon is the main ingredient
    • Blend of fibres, including beet pulp, to reduce hairballs
    • L-carnitine helps keep weight off or maintain a healthy weight

    Cons
    • Not all cats like it


    9. Blue Buffalo Indoor Hairball Control Dry Cat Food

    Blue Buffalo Indoor Hairball Control Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Deboned chicken, chicken meal, brown rice
    Protein Content: 32%
    Fat Content: 15%
    Calories: 397 kcal/cup

    Blue Buffalo Indoor Hairball Control Dry Cat Food has deboned chicken as the main ingredient and includes a variety of healthy veggies, fruit, and grains. This source of high-quality protein combined with natural sources of fibre helps with nutrient absorption and aids in reducing hairballs. There are included omega-3 and -6 fatty acids for a smooth coat and healthy skin, along with the Blue Buffalo LifeSource Bits that support overall body health. Like all Blue Buffalo products, it doesn’t have fillers or artificial preservatives or colours.

    But some cats might experience stomach upset with this food, and some cats might not want to eat it, especially the LifeSource Bits.

    Pros
    • Deboned chicken as the main ingredient
    • Natural sources of fibre to reduce hairballs
    • LifeSource Bits for antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins
    • No artificial ingredients

    Cons
    • Some cats might develop an upset stomach
    • Some cats won’t eat it


    10. Whiskas Hairball Control Dry Cat Food

    Whiskas Hairball Control Dry Cat Food

    Main Ingredients: Ground whole-grain corn, chicken by-product meal, corn gluten meal
    Protein Content: 25–30%
    Fat Content: 5%
    Calories: 370 kcal/cup

    Whiskas Hairball Control Dry Cat Food is affordable and has natural fibre to help with hairballs (a high 9%). It contains “treats” mixed in with the kibble. Most cats seem to love this food, but there are a few issues.

    First, the first and main ingredient is ground corn, and we would prefer to see meat in the top spot. Second, it doesn’t help all cats with hairball issues. Finally, there are multiple fillers in this food.

    Pros
    • Affordable
    • Uses natural fibre for hairballs
    • Most cats love it

    Cons
    • Main ingredient is corn
    • Won’t help all cats with hairballs
    • Full of fillers

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    Buyer’s Guide: Picking the Best Cat Foods for Hairballs in Canada

    Now that you’ve gone through the reviews, here are a few points that might help you find the right food for your cat, along with tips on reducing hairballs in other ways.

    Fibre

    Fibre is one of the most important ingredients in cat food to aid with hairballs. It works in the digestive system and can help move the swallowed hair through the gastrointestinal tract. Hairballs are supposed to be pooped out, which fibre can assist with, so this means less regurgitation.

    Fibre can also make your cat feel fuller for longer, so it can help with weight issues. Fibre should range from 8% to 10% in dry food and 2% to 4% in canned.

    Fatty Acids

    Almost all cat food contains fatty acids, primarily omega-3 and -6. These ingredients promote healthy skin and coat, which can mean less shedding and consequently, less hair for your cat to swallow. It starts with the skin, so providing your cat with a healthy diet with the right amount of fibre and fatty acids means you will hopefully see fewer hairballs on your floors.

    young cat sitting on wooden table with hairball
    Image Credit: RJ22, Shutterstock

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    Reducing Hairballs

    Besides being gross, hairballs can lead to serious medical issues, which might require surgery. The right food is a significant part of reducing hairballs, but there are a few other techniques that you can try.

    Brushing

    This is a simple and effective way to reduce hairballs. Make a point of brushing your cat as often as possible, with once a day being ideal. This will remove most of the excess fur that your cat would normally ingest. Some breeds need daily brushing regardless, but even shorthaired cats can shed excessively and will benefit from frequent brushing.

    Supplements

    There are plenty of supplements on the market designed to minimize hairballs, and they can come in the form of treats or a gel that your cat can lick off your finger. Most of these supplements have fibre or lubricants to make the swallowed hair move easily through the digestive system.

    scottish cat taking vitamins
    Image Credit: Anton27, Shutterstock

    Speaking to Your Vet

    If you’ve switched foods and tried the grooming and hairball remedies and your cat is still throwing up hairballs, make an appointment with your vet. They can do an exam to ensure that there isn’t something else going on. They can also advise you on what products might best help your cat.

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    Conclusion

    To recap, our overall favourite cat food for hairball issues is IAMS Proactive Health Adult Hairball Care Dry Cat Food. It’s high in natural fibre, which includes beet pulp and prebiotics. Purina’s ONE Hairball Formula Dry Cat Food is affordable and effectively uses natural fibre to help minimize hairballs.

    Hill’s Science Diet Urinary & Hairball Control Dry Cat Food is our premium choice pick. It’s quite high in natural fibre and helps both the urinary tract and digestive system. Finally, Royal Canin’s Feline Care Nutrition Hairball Care is our vet’s choice because it uses a precise blend of fibres to help move swallowed hair through the gastrointestinal tract.

    We hope that these reviews have helped you find a food that will not only help with the hairball problem but will also provide your cat with a healthy and balanced diet.


    Featured Image Credit: RJ22, Shutterstock

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