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Hokkaido

Hokkaido Featured Image

Height: 18-20 inches
Weight: 44-66 pounds
Lifespan: 12-15 years
Colors: White, sesame, brindle, red, black
Suitable for: Individuals or active families with older children looking for a hardy and devoted dog
Temperament: Loyal, intelligent, affectionate, independent

What can you say about a dog that hunted bears for his job? The Hokkaido is one tough customer when it comes to courage. This pup is an ancient Japanese breed with a history that goes back hundreds of years to 300 AD and likely earlier than that. He is quite cold-tolerant, having lived in the arctic-like environment of its homeland.

The Hokkaido has a distinct appearance with close-set eyes and a muscular body. Centuries of selectively breeding encouraged these traits. This pup is on the pathway to becoming a recognized breed by the American Kennel Club (AKC). Right now, it’s part of the Foundation Stock Service group to establish its lineage and increase the number of dogs in the United States.

As you may guess, the background of the Hokkaido shows up in many unique ways, both physically and behaviorally. This pup is fiercely loyal to his owner, which is understandable given his native land. The rugged terrain was sparsely populated, making it easy for him to bond with his human companions. There are several other things about the Hokkaido that make this pup fascinating.

Divider 1Hokkaido Puppies – Before You Buy…

the dog breeds Hokkaido runs on the lawn
Credit: Happy monkey, Shutterstock
Energy
Trainability
Health
Lifespan
Sociability

We’ll start by saying upfront that the Hokkaido is not the best choice for first-time pet owners or families with small children. His background fostered toughness and independence, which don’t meld well in these home situations. This pup is both extremely intelligent and willful at times. He’ll do best with an owner who has experience with raising dogs.

The Hokkaido is a devoted pet, which means he’ll make an excellent watchdog. However, he only has a moderate tendency to bark or howl. When he’s vocal, pay attention to what he’s trying to tell you. As you may expect, his prey drive is strong. After all, he is a hunter at heart. This pup also has a relatively high wanderlust potential. We recommend keeping him on a leash when outdoors.

While the Hokkaido is affectionate with his family, he is reserved around strangers. That makes early socialization imperative to cultivate proper canine manners. This pup isn’t overly sensitive, but he needs attention to stay happy. It’s also wise since it’ll give him more opportunities for mental stimulation. Problem-solving is a part of his skillset that you’ll need to satisfy.

What’s the Price of Hokkaido Puppies?

The chances of finding a Hokkaido puppy puts this dog into the deal-breaker category. This breed is extremely rare, even in his homeland. If you can’t find a reputable seller in this country, you can import one from Japan. That will add to the cost of a pup, which you may also have to quarantine once he arrives here. It isn’t easy to estimate a price. However, we’d put in the four-figure range.

The breed is generally healthy, with few significant issues. However, the Hokkaido Association of North American (HANA) has taken a firm stance on mandatory testing and screenings for this pup, which we’ll discuss later in this guide. We strongly urge you to only get your puppy from a breeder who has followed these standards of the club. Avoid buying a pet from so-called puppy mills.

Doing your research before is always a wise plan, especially when making such an important decision, like getting a dog. Pet ownership costs money and time. A Hokkaido needs consistent training from day one. He must meet other people and dogs early in his life to hone his canine manners. Then, there’s the cost of bringing a puppy home.

The first year is typically the most expensive, especially given the cost of getting a Hokkaido. Spaying and neutering after your pup has reached sexual maturity is another significant expense. You can expect to pay over $1,300 when you get your dog and around $500 to $1,000 annually after that. We recommend staying current with preventive care to keep your pooch healthy.

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3 Little-Known Facts About Hokkaido

1. The Hokkaido holds an honor few—if any—other breeds have

How many dog breeds can boast of being a living monument? The Hokkaido received this honor in 1937, the year that he also took on his present-day name.

2. The Hokkaido shares an unusual trait with other spitz breeds

One of the most distinguishing characteristics of Spitz breeds like the Chow Chow is a bluish-black tongue. While it’s not an official part of the breed standard, this color isn’t a fault for a Hokkaido. No one knows why some dogs inherited this characteristic or, for that matter, why both polar bears and giraffes have it, too.

3. The Hokkaido is well-equipped to handle the outdoors

One look at the Hokkaido, and you know he is an outdoor dog. He has smaller ears than many similar dogs to avoid heat loss and frostbite. His paws are large for trekking through snow and rocky terrains. This pup also has a thick double coat to keep him warm.

hokaido
Image Credit: Pxhere

Temperament & Intelligence of the Hokkaido

If you’ve been around Spitz breeds before, you’ll recognize the reserved manner and almost cat-like behavior of the Hokkaido. This pup is relatively adaptable when it comes to getting comfortable in his new home with his family. However, he forges strong bonds with his human companions. That gives him a moderate tendency for separation anxiety.

The Hokkaido is a dignified dog, which even appears in the breed standard. His gait shows this trait. He is not shy, nor is he vicious. However, it’s essential to establish the owner-pet relationship early in your pup’s life. It’s vital for building trust with your pet.

Are These Dogs Good for Families?

The Hokkaido has several qualities that make him an excellent choice for a family pet. He is devoted and will protect his home turf. He is a loving pup and isn’t yippy. However, he can become mouthy as a puppy, which you’ll need to curb early. While he is an affectionate dog, he’ll do better in a household with older children who can learn to respect his space.

Does This Breed Get Along with Other Pets?

The Hokkaido can get along with other dogs if you socialize him as a puppy. We’d suggest only raising him with pups of a comparable size or larger because of his strength and stamina. Other pets are another story. We don’t recommend getting this pooch if you have a cat or other small animals. His prey drive is too keen to risk him being around them.

Divider 4Things to Know When Owning a Hokkaido:

It’s essential to understand that a Hokkaido needs consistent training and daily reinforcement of the house rules. He wants to please you, but you may need to remind him of that fact. He’ll make a wonderful pet as long as he doesn’t get bored. That’s when he can develop bad habits like digging or chewing.

hokaidos
Image Credit: Magdalena Niemiec, Wikimedia Commons

Food & Diet Requirements

The Hokkaido is an energetic dog that needs a diet to keep up with his activity level. You should feed him a diet meant for medium-sized dogs. Offer three to four meals as a puppy, cutting back to two when he’s an adult. This pup has a moderate tendency toward weight gain. Therefore, keep an eye on his body condition to make sure he stays fit.

Exercise

Daily exercise is essential when owning a Hokkaido. It’s also an excellent opportunity to bond with your pet. He’s not an intense dog. Instead, his dignified manner shows in his play and activity. However, he’s not as playful as perhaps a Golden Retriever is, but he’ll still enjoy a game of fetch or tug-of-war. We recommend not leaving him alone in the backyard so that he won’t get bored.

Training

The Hokkaido is eager to please and is intelligent enough to learn a variety of tricks. However, he is often willful as a puppy. We suggest using treats as training aids to convince him that it’s a smart idea to obey your commands. Don’t be afraid to challenge your pup. He has the endurance and strength to handle it. Teach him new things to reinforce your bond. Just hold back on the harsh reprimands.

dog breed hokkaido quickly runs
Credit: Happy monkey, Shutterstock

Grooming ✂️

Like many Spitz breeds, the Hokkaido does a decent job of keeping himself clean. He is a seasonal shedder and will blow his coat twice a year. Weekly brushing can help keep the hair under control and promote healthy circulation in his skin. Despite its thickness, we strongly urge you not to shave him during the summer. Remember that dogs don’t sweat like people. It’s not going to make him cooler.

Health and Conditions

The rarity of the Hokkaido has helped keep some genetic health issues under control. The strong leadership of the HANA has also played a vital role. There are several screenings that the organization requires of registered breeders. We recommend that you follow their advice and ensure these are done on the sire, dam, and puppies as necessary.

Minor Conditions
Serious Conditions
  • Collie eye anomaly
  • Hip dysplasia
  • OFA/CERF eye examination
  • OFA Cardiac Evaluation

Divider 5Male vs Female

The Hokkaido stands out from many breeds because sexual dimorphism, or the difference between the sexes, is part of the Federation Cynologique Internationale’s (FCI) standard. The female is smaller but sometimes longer than the male. There is also the expected weight difference. Otherwise, both make delightful pets in the right home.

Divider 3Final Thoughts

While you may not have heard of the Hokkaido, he’s a breed worth seeking out if you have previous pet owner experience and the time to devote to this loyal pup. He’s a handsome dog that is about as tough as they come. Despite his strength and hunting background, this pup is loving and gentle. In many ways, you can say inviting this pooch into your life is more like a relationship than pet ownership.


Featured Image Credit: Midori, Wikimedia Commons